Mother Of Murdered Officer Sues Walgreens And Security Guard Over Son’s Death

Jersey City Detective Melvin Santiago was murdered by Lawrence Campbell after responding to a robbery at Walgreens.

Jersey City Detective Melvin Santiago was murdered by Lawrence Campbell after responding to a robbery at Walgreens.

Detective Melvin Santiago’s Family Sues Walgreens Over His Murder

Jersey City, NJ – The mother of murdered Jersey City Detective Melvin Santiago is suing Walgreens, the security company for the store, and a security guard for the murder of her son.

The lawsuit accuses the company of failing to provide proper security, and failing to properly warn responding officers about the circumstances of the incident, according to NJ.com.

The murder of Detective Santiago occurred on July 13, 2014 at a 24-hour Walgreens pharmacy.

Detective Santiago’s killer, Lawrence Campbell, told a store customer to watch the news because he was “going to be famous.” Campbell assaulted a security guard at the pharmacy and took his gun.

During the robbery, employees fled to a back room and called 911. According to the lawsuit, the security guard failed to report that the violent robber had disarmed him and was in possession of his gun.

Detective Santiago, 23, and his partner arrived at around 4:11 AM and was immediately shot in the head by Campbell, killing him. Other officers on scene returned fire, killing Campbell.

The lawsuit claims that prior to the robbery, Walgreens stopped hiring off-duty officers for security and began to use under-trained security guards in order to save money.

“In order to increase profits, the owners and operators of the pharmacy elected to provide reduced security at the pharmacy citing budget concerns,” the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit requests damages for medical and funeral expenses, as well as psychological distress, and compensation for the loss of her son’s support, guidance, advice, and assistance.

Walgreens and the security company have not responded to requests for comment.

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