FBI Director James Comey Says Perceived Police Misconduct Epidemic Not Based On Facts

FBI Director James Comey says that stats don't back the media hype of racist police officers.

FBI Director James Comey says that stats don’t back the media hype of racist police officers.

FBI Director James Comey Says Perceived Police Misconduct Epidemic Not Based On Facts

FBI director James Comey speaking at the International Chiefs of Police Conference in San Diego Sunday said that statistics may show there is no police shooting epidemic involving minorities. He pointed to videos depicting alleged and perceived police misconduct as fuel to the fire. We know of course that those videos, most of which have passed through the filter of sensational media, never tell the whole story.

Regardless, Comeys main point was that there is a lack of solid statistical evidence which proves that there is a police misconduct epidemic because there just isn’t enough statistics to prove one way or the other. Public perception is based on videos, not facts. “It is a narrative driven by video images of real and gut-wrenching misconduct, by images of possible misconduct, by images of perceived misconduct,” Comey went on to say, “Our officers see the videos. They desperately do not want to be in one. They think about that all the time.”

In a time when every single police action involving the use of deadly force in particular is reported and scrutinized by the media then consumed by the general public, it’s safe to say that nothing is being hidden. It’s all out there for the world to see, but again mainly told through media bias.

Conversely, the same media which intentionally misreports these perceived acts of “police misconduct” are for the most part silent when it comes to the massive and extremely disturbing rise in violent crime in the inner-cities – in particular, crimes with black victims. Oddly enough, as this trend continues to rise, so does the scrutiny in which police face; the same police who have been tasked to risk their lives working in these communities and are dedicated in attempting to curb the violence.

Those in law enforcement are confident that more and accurate statistics would show that the propaganda spewed by groups like Black Lives Matter is just that, baseless, one-sided, hate-filled propaganda. But statistics are like a trees falling in a forest: if there’s no one around, do they make a sound? If statistics prove, as some already have, that there is no bias toward black men by law enforcement, would it be accurately reported in the mainstream media? Probably not.

Do you think that accurate statistics will have any impact on people’s perception of police? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page.